The Mayflower Autonomous Ship Project

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With no human captain or onboard crew, the Mayflower Autonomous Ship (MAS) uses AI and the energy from the sun to travel further and reveal more about the ocean. Working in tandem with scientists and other autonomous vessels, MAS provides a flexible and cost-effective platform for deepening understanding of critical issues such as climate change, ocean plastic pollution and marine mammal conservation. In parallel, the development of marine autonomous systems promises to transform ocean-related industries such as shipping, oil & gas, telecommunications, security & defence, fishing & aquaculture.

The Mayflower Autonomous Ship project is led by marine research organisation ProMare with IBM acting as both lead technology partner and lead scientific partner for the project. Other partners are listed here.

On 7 September 2021, Mayflower Autonomous Ship (MAS) was re-launched to resume its testing and scientific research schedule. Science teams associated with the equipment installed on MAS will...

Plymouth, UK, 20th July, 2021… On June 15th 2021, marine research non-profit ProMare made an attempt to cross the Atlantic with the crewless Mayflower Autonomous Ship (MAS400). The mission was...

Ocean research non-profit ProMare and IBM (NYSE: IBM) have announced the Mayflower Autonomous Ship (MAS400) is now in international waters as it attempts to cross the Atlantic ocean and reach the United States.

In 1620, despite the vast challenge ahead, 102 passengers of the original Mayflower sailed from Plymouth, England on a hazardous voyage to the New World, inspired by hopes for a better future

Helmed by an AI Captain, powered by IBM Automation, discover how this crewless ship will self-navigate across Oceans.

A fully-autonomous, AI powered marine research vessel

This is Artie - the world’s one and only, seven-armed octopus chatbot. He’s hitching a ride on the Mayflower Autonomous Ship and inspiring a global dialogue on the health of the ocean. Find...

Discover how IBM and ProMare are enabling autonomous ships, innovation and marine exploration with AI, automation, edge computing and cloud technologies through a multi-part docuseries.

The events of the last year have revealed a new truism in business. No matter what the sector or geography, success increasingly depends on the resilience to survive and thrive in the face of external disruption.

By Raphael Alden Sacks When I first heard about IBM’s involvement with the Mayflower Autonomous Ship, I knew I wanted to play a role. I was drawn to the ambitious goal of the project: building...

Ocean research non-profit ProMare and IBM (NYSE:IBM) have announced the completion and launch of the Mayflower Autonomous Ship (MAS) – an AI and solar powered marine research vessel which will traverse oceans gathering vital environmental data.

Humans have been plying the seas throughout history. But it wasn’t until the late 19th century that we began to truly study the ocean itself. An expedition in 1872 to 1876, by the Challenger, a converted Royal Navy gunship, traveled nearly 70,000 nautical miles and catalogued over 4,000 previously unknown species, building the foundations for modern ocean science.

Close your eyes for a moment. With the world struggling with COVID-19, civil unrest, global political upheaval and environmental concerns, it’s tempting to imagine a place to escape to. But what comes to mind?

Whether human, or human-designed Artificial Intelligence, each represents a response to an era’s big challenge. By Diane Cardwell His ship leaked and was nearing the end of its useful life. He...

IBM (NYSE: IBM) and marine research organization Promare, have announced that a new 'AI Captain', which will enable the Mayflower Autonomous Ship (MAS) to self-navigate across the Atlantic later this year, is to go to sea this month for testing.

IBM (NYSE: IBM) announced today that it has joined a global consortium of partners, led by marine research organization ProMare, that are building an unmanned, fully-autonomous ship that will cross the Atlantic on the fourth centenary of the original Mayflower voyage in September 2020.

To cross the Atlantic with an unmanned, autonomous ship will push technology to its limits. Like the Mayflower’s 101 passengers in 1620, we’ll also need a lot of help and some good luck.